Thursday, March 25, 2010

Feast of the Annunciation March 25

The feast of the Annunciation is one of the most important in the Church year. Last year, I wrote for this day:


"It has been suggested, with irony, tongue in cheek, that the Incarnation is the 'Anglican heresy.' That is, based on what theology students are taught as a basic point: That over-emphasis of any single point of doctrine causes imbalance, and therefore neglect of other points of doctrine, resulting in distortion of the truth so severe that it becomes heresy. And, indeed if any single point of doctrine comes across as the one most strongly emphasized by authentic Anglican teaching, it is the Incarnation of the Word: Nonetheless, we must insist that the Incarnation and the Trinity are two points of doctrine that, by their nature, cannot be over-emphasized. It is impossible to say too much about the Incarnation; and frankly, impossible on a human level to say enough about it, ever.

"Where would we be without this simple fact? 'The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us.' (John 1:14) The whole opening of John's Gospel is about the Trinity and about the Incarnation. When it opens, we hear the Name God, and we hear it three times:

"'In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God.'"

You may read the entire sermon by clicking here.

3 comments:

Nathan said...

"...indeed if any single point of doctrine comes across as the one most strongly emphasized by authentic Anglican teaching, it is the Incarnation of the Word: Nonetheless, we must insist that the Incarnation and the Trinity are two points of doctrine that, by their nature, cannot be over-emphasized. It is impossible to say too much about the Incarnation; and frankly, impossible on a human level to say enough about it, ever."

It seems to me that a nice balance can be found by an equally over-emphasized teaching of Christ's Crucifixion, Resurrection, Ascension, and the Promise of His Return. Can enough really be said about any of these points?

Nathan
'ruceres'

Fr. David said...

If we celebrate the Nativity of our Lord on December 25 then we must celebrate his conception (the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary) on March 25. "The Word was made flesh and dwelt among us" at our Lord's conception in the womb of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Christmas is celebrated on December 25 because it is nine months after the Annunciation and not the other way around.

Celebrating the Annunciation is a pro life statement in of itself. We are a people of life.

Fr. Don Lerow said...

The Virgin Orans Great Panagiya, 12th Century. "The Praying Mother of God" of Yaroslavl. I think this Icon touches my heart more than any. It suggest to me the Virgin as "containing the uncontainable." It is striking to me that the Christ Child within the Virgin is something that she nor the world can control. A suggestion of things to come. Wow!